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Lobbying in European Union

The more political influence the European Union (“EU”) gains on a global level and the more policy areas it covers, the more interesting it becomes for lobbyists.[citation needed] With the Enlargement of the European Union in 2004, this development has taken a further step, bringing in not only a lot more players and stakeholders but a wide range of different political cultures and traditions, as well.[citation needed] According to Austrian Member of the European Parliament (“MEP”) Hans-Peter Martin, the value of lobby invitations and offers each...
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Etymology of Lobbying

In a report carried by the BBC, an OED lexicographer has shown that “lobbying” finds its roots in the gathering of Members of Parliament and peers in the hallways (“lobbies”) of the UK Houses of Parliament before and after parliamentary debates. One now-debunked story held that the term originated at the Willard Hotel in Washington, DC, where it was supposedly used by Ulysses S. Grant to describe the political wheelers and dealers who frequented the hotel’s lobby to access Grant—who was often there to enjoy a cigar and...
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What is Lobbying

Lobbying (also lobby) is the act of attempting to influence decisions made by officials in the government, most often legislators or members of regulatory agencies. Lobbying is done by many different types of people and organized groups, including individuals in the private sector, corporations, fellow legislators or government officials, or advocacy groups (interest groups). Lobbyists may be among a legislator’s constituencies, meaning a voter or block of voters within his or her electoral district, or not; they may engage in lobbying as a business, or not....